Deferred Deposits, Delayed Justice?

24 11 2009

2010 General Assembly Facing Tough Issues

From the KY Gazette  (November 2009)

 by Laura Cullen Glasscock at glasscock@kentuckygazette.com

Deferred Deposits [ 2010 General Assembly]

The provisions of the check-cashing and deferred deposit statutes are currently contained in Subtitle 9 of KRS Chapter 286 that authorizes licensed deferred deposit businesses to charge a service fee not to exceed $15 per $100 borrowed. The service fee is for a period of 14 days. Borrowers may obtain one loan not to exceed $500 at any one time, and rollovers are prohibited. The deferred deposit transaction statutes were amended in 2009, effective July 1, 2010, by House Bill 444 to expand regulation of the industry. The legislation also provides for a 10-year moratorium on licensure of new businesses after July 1, 2009. A review by staff of the Kentucky Office of Financial Institutions annual reports found the number of licensed payday locations in Kentucky increased from 214 in 1998 to 754 currently.

On its face, a $15 fee per $100 borrowed appears to be interest in the amount of 15 percent. However, because of the 14-day loan term, a new loan can be obtained 26 times per year, which results in an annual percentage rate of 391 percent. Reportedly, most borrowers are unable to repay the loan with their next paycheck. As a result, borrowers often take out a new loan before their next paycheck, resulting in an additional fee. Several sources report that 87 percent of new loans are opened within two weeks or before the borrower’s next payday, indicating they are unable to repay the original or previous loan and sustain the cost of living expenses without taking out a new loan. This common practice is referred to as “rollover” Making multiple rollovers, referred to as “churning,” results in an annual percentage rate of 391 percent in Kentucky. Nationwide, churning accounts for 76 percent of the deferred deposit total loan volume.

There are alternative methods of providing small, short-term loans up to $1,000. In an effort to reach the unbanked population, the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation is currently conducting a two-year pilot program for banks to provide small loans up to $1,000 to borrowers, even if they have poor credit. Thirty-one banks in 15 states are enrolled in the project, including two banks in Kentucky, Citizens Union Bank in Shelbyville and Kentucky Bank in Paris.

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